Some people on the Internet (incl. Preet Banerjee of “The Globe and Mail” and Jenny Lang of “The Frugal Guru”) have been writing that “expensive shoes are not an investment” because, according to the actual definition of an investment, it’s something that returns value over time.

They MOSTLY have a point. MOST shoes do depreciate in value. However, I don’t fully agree with their assessments.

How to “invest” in your shoes:

1. Quality shoes that are well taken care of can last a LONG time. Hell of a lot longer than that $20 or $40 or even $60 pair of polyurethane junk.

2. Quality alone an investment does not make: said shoes should also be from a designer brand. (And I’m not talking stereotypical-expensive Louboutin or anything. Just coveted and recognizable; even niche. I.e. Underground UK or Fluevog.)

3. When said style of shoe goes vintage and/or is discontinued, provided you’ve been taking good care, you can easily eBay them for a significant % more than you originally paid for them (your dear customer might even throw in an arm and a leg — for your jarred-body-parts collection.)

4. Ta-da. The investment returns.

Some people on the Internet (incl. Preet Banerjee of “The Globe and Mail” and Jenny Lang of “The Frugal Guru”) have been writing that “expensive shoes are not an investment” because, according to the actual definition of an investment, it’s something that returns value over time.

They MOSTLY have a point. MOST shoes do depreciate in value. However, I don’t fully agree with their assessments.

How to “invest” in your shoes:

1. Quality shoes that are well taken care of can last a LONG time. Hell of a lot longer than that $20 or $40 or even $60 pair of polyurethane junk.

2. Quality alone an investment does not make: said shoes should also be from a designer brand. (And I’m not talking stereotypical-expensive Louboutin or anything. Just coveted and recognizable; even niche. I.e. Underground UK or Fluevog.)

3. When said style of shoe goes vintage and/or is discontinued, provided you’ve been taking good care, you can easily eBay them for a significant % more than you originally paid for them (your dear customer might even throw in an arm and a leg — for your jarred-body-parts collection.)

4. Ta-da. The investment returns.

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